Courses

Core Courses

The history core seeks to introduce the essential background for an educated understanding of the peoples and forces affecting the development of western societies. In a historical context, students examine and discuss issues and questions raised in areas of literature, theology, philosophy, science, politics, art, architecture, economics, and human behavior. Through a study of primary sources and texts relating to these areas, students develop critical reading, writing, and analytical skills. The history core courses address timeless questions of past and present inequalities based on race, religion, class, gender, economic status, and geography and provide insight into the common good of the global human community.

The history core is divided into two categories of classes: surveys (HIS 101, 102, 103, and 104) and skills courses (HIS 110 and 120).

Students take one class from each category. Of these, one class must focus on U.S. History (HIS 103, 104, and 120) and one must focus on global history (HIS 101, 102, and 110).

For example, students who take HIS 101 or HIS 102 as their survey must then take HIS 120 as their skills course. Or, students who take HIS 110 as their skills course must take HIS 103 or 104 as their survey.


Course Descriptions:


HIS 101 Western Civilization to 1648 (3) A survey of western civilization from the Classical Period to the mid-1600s. Emphasis is given to Classical Greece, the Hellenistic Age, Roman History, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Reformation, and the rise of the nation states. Political, social, economic, and geographical relationships are integrated and analyzed.

HIS 102 Western Civilization Since 1648 (3) A survey of western civilization from the Scientific Revolution to the present. Emphasis is given to the Scientific Revolution; the Enlightenment; the French Revolution; industrialization; political, social, and intellectual changes in the nineteenth century; the Russian Revolution; the world wars; the Cold War; and the collapse of Communism. Political, social, economic, and geographical relationships are integrated and analyzed.

HIS 103 The United States Since 1876 (3) An inquiry into America’s development from European encounter through Reconstruction, colonial settlement, the American Revolution, the Early Republic, Antebellum America, and the Civil War.

HIS 104 The United States Since 1876 (3) An inquiry into America’s development since 1876 including the Gilded Age, Progressivism, the Great Depression, both world wars, Vietnam, and the many diverse social and political developments from the 1950s to the present.

HIS 110 Introduction to Global Historical Studies (3) An introductory course on historical skills, including critical reading, writing, and thinking; thesis statements; geographical awareness; oral communication; and distinguishing between primary and secondary sources. Each course will have a subtitle which would indicate the subject content of the course, which would indicate the subject content of the course.

HIS 120 Introduction to American Historical Studies (3) An introductory course on historical skills, including critical reading, writing, and thinking; thesis statements; geographical awareness; oral communication; and distinguishing between primary and secondary sources. Each course will have a subtitle which would indicate the subject content of the course, which will focus on an American history topic.

HIS 203. Historical Methods (3) (W)
A survey of the basics of historical research through a study of a topic determined by the instructor. Students will complete a research paper as the capstone project for this course.

HIS 290. Honors History (3)
An advanced study of modern European or American history in which students analyze historical writings and primary sources. This course is writing intensive and stresses participation. This course fulfills the college core requirement for HIS 110 Introduction to Global Historical Studies.
Prerequisite: Honors Program.

HIS 297. Special Topics in History (3)
A lower-division course on a special topic in history as selected by the instructor. No prerequisites.

HIS 301. Modern Latin America (3)
A survey of nineteenth and twentieth century Latin America. Prerequisite: Six hours of history.

HIS 312. Medieval Civilization (3)
A study of the European Middle Ages from about 300-1400. Special attention will be given to the problems faced by feudal society as well as the creative achievements in the areas of economics, politics,
and culture. Prerequisite: Six hours of history.

HIS 314. The Renaissance and the Reformation (3)
A study of the economic and intellectual expansions of Europe and the religious transformation of the sixteenth
and early seventeenth centuries. Prerequisite: Six hours of history.

HIS 317. The Age of Absolutism and the Enlightenment (3)
A study of absolutism of the European monarchs and the influence of the Enlightenment on the intellectual life of Europe. Political, economic, social and cultural developments are analyzed with a view to marking the major transformations of the period and the effects on later western culture. Prerequisite: Six hours of history.

HIS 318. French Revolution and Napoleon (3)
An examination of the background, causes, course, and significance of the French Revolution. The impact of
the Napoleonic period on Europe constitutes an important portion of the course. Prerequisite: Six hours of history.

HIS 319. Europe: 1815-1900 (3)
A study of the major political, economic, social, and intellectual changes in nineteenth century Europe focusing on nationalism, political participation, industrialization, socialism, Marxism, Darwinism, imperial-
ism, and the growth of the middle class. The effects of the Irish famine and Italian and German unification are analyzed. Prerequisite: Six hours of history.

HIS 320. Europe in the Era of the World Wars (3)
A study of World War I, the Russian Revolution, the interwar period, and World War II. Attention will be given
to the rise of dictators. Prerequisite: Six hours of history.

HIS 322. Europe Since 1945 (3)
Emphasis is on the postwar period, the Cold War, politics, the process of decolonization, the European Union, the changes in Eastern Europe, and contemporary developments. Prerequisite: Six hours of history.

HIS 323. Women in European History (3) (D)
A study of the roles and lives of European women and their circumstances, activities, and achievements from
the late 1700s to the present. Attention will be given to the concept of “separate spheres”; increasing public involvement; educational, vocational, and professional advancement; the suffrage movement; the role of women in the Russian Revolution and Stalin’s Russia; the situation of women in Nazi Germany; the involvement of women in the world wars; the postwar period; and the current situation of women. Prerequisite: Six hours of history.

HIS 324. Women in American History (3) (D)
A study of the experiences of American women from the colonial era to the present, focusing on the major
historical issues and historiographical debates surrounding American women’s history. Topics will include: the legal status of women; class, ethnic, racial, and regional differences amongst American women; women’s education; the suffrage movement; the female economy; and feminism. Prerequisite: Six hours of history.

HIS 325. Women’s History (3) (D)
A study of the cultural, social, legal, and political situation of women. Attention is given to the effects of tradition, class, race, education, vocational and professional opportunities, and government policies regarding women. Specific topics include women in American history, women in European history, and women in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Prerequisite: Six hours of history.

HIS 326. African-American History (3) (D)
A study of the major issues in African-American history, with a focus on the study of primary documents. Topics include the slave trade, slavery, slave resistance, emancipation, the Jim Crow society, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Civil Rights movement. Prerequisite: Six hours of history.

HIS 330. World Cultures (3) (D)
A historical study of the principal cultures of the world from prehistory to the modern period. Prerequisite: Six hours of history.

HIS 331. Asian History (3) (D)
An introduction to the history of Asia with emphasis on India, China, and Japan. Although the events of Asian history from the earliest centuries are examined, the course focuses primarily on the significant developments from the nineteenth century to the present. Prerequisite: Six hours of history.

HIS 341. Colonial America (3)
A study of the colonial period that will focus on the British North American colonies and include the Age of Discovery; a comparison of the northern, southern, and middle colonies; the interaction between whites, blacks, and Native Americans; and leading political, economic, ideological, and social developments through the French and Indian war. Prerequisite: Six hours of history.

HIS 342. The American Revolution and the Early Republic (3)
A detailed study of the causes and results of the American Revolution and a study of the writing of
the Constitution and the subsequent development of the early republic. Prerequisite: Six hours of history.

HIS 344. The Civil War and Reconstruction (3)
A study of the origins of the Civil War, the status of both the North and the South during the war, and the efforts to restore the Union. Prerequisite: Six hours of history.

HIS 350. The Making of Modern America (3)
This course will explore the emergence of the United States into a world power following the end of Reconstruction to the outset of the First World War. The development of American industrial might, the rise of cities, immigration, and the establishment of the American empire in the Pacific and the Caribbean will be examined. Special attention will be paid to the Populist and Progressive movements and the impact that each
had on the modern United States. Prerequisite: Six hours of history.

HIS 351. US: World Wars and Great Depression (3)
This course will examine World War I, the 1920s, the Great Depression, and World War II. Prerequisite: Six hours of history.

HIS 352. The United States Since 1945 (3)
A study of the Cold War, the civil rights movement, Vietnam, the Watergate crisis, and other major economic, political, and social developments. Prerequisite: Six hours of history.

HIS 355. The Vietnam Wars, 1945-1975 (3) (W)
An examination of the conflicts in Southeast Asia during the 20th century, the course will focus on the American
involvement in Vietnam and the war’s legacy in the modern United States. Prerequisite: History core or permission of the instructor.

HIS 360. The South (3)
A survey of the American South from the antebellum period through the development of the New South. Special attention will be paid to the position of Alabama in the region. Prerequisite: Six hours of history.

HIS 362. American Presidents (3)
A study of American presidents from George Washington to the present that primarily uses biographies and biographical material in analyzing how the presidency has changed as an institution. Prerequisite: Six hours of history.

HIS 364. American Environmental History (3)
This course examines both the ways that the environment helped shape American history as well as mankind's impact on the American environment. Issues such as the environmental movement in the U.S., including major environmental debates, will also be addressed. Prerequisite: Six hours of history.

HIS 495. Seminar Topic (3)
Prerequisite course for HIS 499 Seminar. HIS 495 will be cross-listed with an upper-division history course each fall. Its topic will
vary depending on the instructor.

HIS 496. Readings in History (3)
A directed reading program. Prerequisites: Six hours of history and permission of professor.

HIS 497. Topics in History (3)
An advanced history course covering a special topic. Prerequisite: Six hours of history.

HIS 498. Historical Internship (3-6)
A course designed to give students an introduction to the work of the historian in various fields. Placement may include archives, museums, and historical sites. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and permission of professor.

HIS 499. Seminar (3) (W)
The student will engage in extensive historical analysis and interpretation and will learn the fundamentals of historical research. A major research paper is required. This course will be taught at the senior level and the topic of the seminar will change annually, depending on the interests of the professor directing it. Required of all majors in history and strongly recommended to all history minors. Prerequisite: HIS 495. Permission of professor required.