Summer Institute

The Summer Institute of Christian Spirituality (SICS)

Our annual institute offers a unique blend of academic challenge and spiritual enrichment, specifically designed for adults seeking to deepen their faith, exploring the vast traditions of Christian spirituality and, if you choose, for pursuing one of our certificate or degree programs. The curriculum is made up of a series of one-credit courses offered in one-week or intensive weekend sessions, studying a variety of spiritual masters and mystics, along with biblical, liturgical and social themes. Taught in the Jesuit tradition of excellence, courses may be taken for graduate or undergraduate credit or on an easy listening basis (no required assignments, no grade, no transcript record kept). While rooted in Catholic theology, the program is fully ecumenical and welcomes persons of all faiths.

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We hope you will take advantage of this wonderful opportunity for learning and renewal. If you have never attended Spring Hill College or the Summer Institute, and wish to receive more information about the event, please email (theology@shc.edu) or call us (251-380-4458 or toll-free 877-857-6742) and we will be glad to add you to our mailing list or answer any questions you may have. We look forward to the opportunity of hosting you next summer!

Dr. Timothy R. Carmody
Professor & Director of Graduate Programs in Theology and Ministry
carmody@shc.edu

Summer Institute 2019

We are pleased to announce our courses and professors for the 2019 Summer Institute of Christian Spirituality.

Mobile

Session I: June 3-7, 2019

Morning: Monday - Friday, 9:00 - 11:00 a.m.

SPT524/424 Chiara Lubich and the Focolare Movement (1 credit hour) (Historical)
Rev. Mark Mossa, SJ

Evening: Monday - Thursday, 6:30-9:00 p.m.

SPT536/436 Joseph and His Brothers: Resentment and Reconciliation (1 credit hour) (Biblical)
Dr. Tim Carmody

There are three great cycles of ancestor stories in Genesis: Abraham, Jacob and Joseph. Each is unique in its style and theological insights. The Joseph cycle is the last and the culmination of a growing theme in Genesis: Can God’s people become a great and numerous nation when there are chosen sons and internecine fighting? Is there a way for multiple sons (multiple tribes) to live together and be led by a leader chosen by God? The story of the twelve sons of Jacob and their abuse of and then reconciliation with Joseph provides insight into the competition and resentment inherent in God’s call of a people and God’s choosing and gifting special persons to serve the people. The story provides great insight into how such a group can be brought to reconciliation and cooperation and what leadership of such a group could look like. This course will examine the narrative strategies of this story cycle as it raises these problems and provides insight and answers. This story provides much insight for Christians today.

Session II: June 10-14, 2019

Morning: Monday - Friday, 9:00 - 11:00 a.m.

SPT543/443 Thomas Merton (1 credit hour) (Historical)
Mr. Bob Grip

Evening: Monday - Thursday, 6:30-9:00 p.m.

SPT571/471 Finding Jesus Among Muslims (1 credit hour) (Moral)
THL574 Readings in Christian Muslim Dialogue (3-credit option available online) (Moral)
Dr. Matthew Bagot

Costs in Mobile

    • Earned Credit: $345 per credit hour
    • Easy Listening (no transcript record kept): $125 per credit hour
    • On-campus lodging: $35/night
    • Cookouts: $12 each

Atlanta

Weekend I: June 21-23, 2019

SPT571/471 Finding Jesus Among Muslims (1 credit hour) (Moral)
THL574 Readings in Christian Muslim Dialogue (3-credit option available online) (Moral)
Dr. Matthew Bagot

Weekend II: June 28-30, 2019

SPT536/436 Joseph and His Brothers: Resentment and Reconciliation (1 credit hour) (Biblical)
Dr. Tim Carmody

There are three great cycles of ancestor stories in Genesis: Abraham, Jacob and Joseph. Each is unique in its style and theological insights. The Joseph cycle is the last and the culmination of a growing theme in Genesis: Can God’s people become a great and numerous nation when there are chosen sons and internecine fighting? Is there a way for multiple sons (multiple tribes) to live together and be led by a leader chosen by God? The story of the twelve sons of Jacob and their abuse of and then reconciliation with Joseph provides insight into the competition and resentment inherent in God’s call of a people and God’s choosing and gifting special persons to serve the people. The story provides great insight into how such a group can be brought to reconciliation and cooperation and what leadership of such a group could look like. This course will examine the narrative strategies of this story cycle as it raises these problems and provides insight and answers. This story provides much insight for Christians today.

Schedule for Atlanta Intensive Weekend

(All events at Ignatius House Retreat Center.)
Friday
    • Dinner: 6:00 p.m.
    • Class: 7:00–9:00 p.m.
 Saturday
    • Class: 9:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m. & 1:00–4:00 p.m.
    • Lunch: 12:00–1:00 p.m.
    • Social, Dinner and Q&A with professor: 6:00 p.m.
Sunday
    • Class: 9:15–11:15 a.m.
    • Mass: 11:30 a.m.
    • Lunch: following Mass

Costs In Atlanta

    • Earned Credit: $345 per credit hour
    • Easy Listening (no transcript record kept): $125 per credit hour
    • Every registered student must choose one option for each weekend:
      • 2 days of room and all meals: $220 per weekend
      • 2 days of all meals: $100 per weekend
      • Saturday lunch, reception and dinner: $50 per weekend
      • Hospitality and Saturday lunch: $30 per weekend
      • Retreat Costs: Please contact Ignatius House Retreat Center at (404) 255-0503 or Ignatiushouse.org.

2019 Faculty

Dr. Matthew Bagot

Matthew Bagot is an Associate Professor of Theology at Spring Hill College specializing in social ethics. He completed his Ph.D. at Boston College in 2010. In 2016, Dr. Bagot presented a paper comparing Catholicism and Islam on religion and politics in Germany and published two articles: a chapter in a book honoring his dissertation director, David Hollenbach, S.J. that compares the latter's work to two contemporary Islamic scholars; and an article on a Catholic contribution to the future of global governance. He received Spring Hill's Edward B. Moody "Teacher of the Year" award for 2013-14.

Dr. Timothy Carmody

Timothy Carmody, a Professor of Theology at Spring Hill College since 1989 and currently the Director of Graduate Programs in Theology and Ministry, is a graduate of The Catholic University of America and a long-time member of the Catholic Biblical Association. This past year he was awarded a CCD/CBA Grant for developing and teaching Biblical courses in the Deacon Formation Program for the Diocese of Jackson, MS. His book, Reading the Bible (Paulist Press 2004), is a well-used textbook in college courses and Bible study groups. He is also the author of The Gospel of Mark: Question by Question (Paulist Press 2008).

Mr. Bob Grip

Rev. Mark Mossa, SJ

Fr. Mark Mossa is Spring Hill College’s Director of Campus Ministry. He has been a Jesuit since 1997, and a priest since 2008. He offers retreats throughout the country for young adults. He holds advanced degrees in Theology, Philosophy, & English, and has studied and taught at Fordham University, Boston College, Loyola University in New Orleans, and the University of South Carolina. He was actively involved in campus ministry at Fordham and Loyola, and also served as Director of Campus Ministry at Jesuit High School in Tampa. Most recently at Fordham, he was a teacher and mentor in the American Catholic Studies program, and a freshman advisor.  He has authored or co-authored three books: Already There: Letting God Find YouSaint Ignatius Loyola—The Spiritual Writings; and Just War, Lasting Peace. He is known for creatively incorporating popular culture into his ministry, teaching and writing. It’s not a surprise to hear him quoting Pope Francis, Linkin Park, Jane Austen or Buffy the Vampire Slayer, maybe even in a single homily or lecture!

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