2016 Participants

2016 SHCURS Participants

Original Research

 

1. Haleigh Minto

Title: Generational Diversity

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Jamie Franco-Zamudio

Abstract:

My project is a presentation of research conducted as part of my individual studies—in collaboration with Dr. Franco-Zamudio—for the Junior League of Mobile’s Leadership Academy. The research focuses mainly on the differences, similarities, unique characteristics, and perspectives of the different generations from the Silent Generation to the Millennials. The primary purpose of this research is to display how one’s generational identity influences their perception of society and themselves.

 

2. Ryan Bujol

Title: The Prediction of the pka of Metal +2 and +3 Complexes Reactions in Aqueous Solutions

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Virgil Jackson

 

3. Alexandra Moorehead

Title: Eating Disorders and the Grounded Theory: Which Aspect of Social Support Are Most Beneficial to Recovery

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Jamie Franco-Zamudio

Abstract:

In this study, the benefits of social support on those recovering from eating disorders were explored. Using grounded theory, an archival analysis was performed through finding online testimonials in order to form a greater understanding of individuals recovering from eating disorders. Four types of social support were examined in this study: emotional support, instrumental support, informational support, and companionship. Through coding the testimonials, it was discovered that, in addition to discussing the social support that they received, many individuals offer the reader of the testimonial social support. Additionally, through using grounded theory and giving a voice to those who have suffered from eating disorders, the testimonials revealed the many facets of social support and which facets were thought to be most beneficial to the recovering individual.

 

4. Alexandra Moorehead & Hailey Owens

Title:  Religiosity, Forgiveness, & Depression

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Chelsea Greer

Abstract:

Research has found that the level of one’s religiosity has an effect on one’s likeliness to forgive. (Greer et al., 2014) We hypothesized multiple correlational relationships prior to the forgiveness study: 1) That people who report that they are struggling with their faith will also score high in unforgiveness and low in forgiveness; 2) People that score high in depression will score high in unforgiveness and low in forgiveness; and 3) People that score high in religious and spiritual struggles will also be high in depression. The online survey we administered contained the Religious & Spiritual Struggle Scale (Exline, Pargament, Grubbs, & Yali, 2014), the Personal Health Questionnaire-9 (Kroenke, Spitzer, & Williams, 2001), the Emotional Forgiveness Scale and Decisional Forgiveness Scale (Worthington, Hook, Utsey, Williams, & Neil, 2007), and the TRIM-12 (McCullough et al., 1998). We had a sample size of N = 54 Spring Hill College students. We used bivariate correlations to test our hypotheses. We found that those who score high in emotional forgiveness tend to score low in religious and spiritual struggles. Additionally, those who score high in depression symptoms tend to score low in emotional forgiveness and high in unforgiveness. Lastly, those who score high in religious and spiritual struggles tend to score high in depression. This research has several potentially interesting implications in areas of mental health, forgiveness, and religion. Furthermore, these findings might also lead mental health workers to consider one’s religious struggles in treating depression.

 

5. Tyler LaPointe & Hailey Owens

Title: Sexism & Bystander Apathy: The Role Gender Stereotypes Play in a Bystander’s Decision to Help

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Jamie Franco-Zamudio

Who is likely to help in an emergency situation? Research reveals that the greater number of people witnessing an emergency situation, the less likely each person will feel responsible for helping the victim (i.e., diffusion of responsibility; Fischer et al., 2011; Garcia, Weaver, Moskowitz, & Darley, 2002; Latane & Darley, 1970; Levine & Crowther, 2008). This phenomenon is called the bystander effect (Latane & Darley, 1970). With regard to witnessing a sexual assault, research by Milburn, Mather, and Conrad (2000) reveals that existing biases and perceptions have an effect on how people view the situation. These preconceptions might affect an individual’s decision to help in this particular emergency situation (Abbate, Ruggieri, and Boca, 2013; Garcia, Weaver, Moskowits, and Darley, 2002). The current research aims to determine whether certain biases (e.g., objectification of women [which can be primed]) will have on a bystander’s decision to help a woman in an emergency situation. Additionally, the current study aims to reveal the role that diffusion of responsibility and victim-blaming will play in one’s decision to help in an emergency situation.

6. Johnathan Billings & Cole Enmon

Title: College Involvement & Future Success

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Jamie Franco-Zamudio

The present study examines the relationship between involvement in Greek life and/or athletics at Spring Hill College and level of academic self-efficacy and other measures of success. Previous research indicates that factors such as peer interactions inside and outside of the classroom, membership in Greek organizations, participation in service learning projects, involvement in athletics and extracurricular activities, and diversity experiences are related to student retention.

 

8. Alexander Mestre

Title: Expression and Purification of Type II-A DNA Topoisomerases

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Allyn Schoeffler

 

9. Rebecca Weis

Title: Random Mutagenesis of Green Florescent Protein by P.C.R.

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Allyn Schoeffler

 

10. Lindsey Barter, Alexis Mogil, Jazmin Pizer, Jessica Richmeyer, & Katherine Sergiovanni

Title: What’s App?: An Analysis of Cell Phone Use and Social Connectedness

People of every generation, gender, race and ethnicity, and discipline have invested in some form of a smartphone over the past few years. While this digital revolution of hand-held, social webs of constant accessibility may seem like a blessing to many, the smartphone’s multiple negative consequences have started to become evident. Feelings of “FOMO,” also known as “fear of missing out,” social distraction, ostracism, and impulsivity have been reported in previous research (Jones, 2014; Roberts, Yaya, & Manolis, 2014; Smith & Williams, 2004; Thorton, Faires, Robbins, & Rollins, 2014). The present study examined how smartphone owners use their phones, in order to determine if a person’s age, race or ethnicity, gender, and field of study or occupation affect their level of attachment to their smartphone. More specifically, we examined smartphone users’ reported feelings of anxiety and phone distraction levels due to feelings of fear of missing out (FOMO). Frequency of social connection styles, and levels of smartphone usage in relation to social perception were also under evaluation. 

11. Melvin Lang

Title: Exploring Diversity in the Workplace: Diversity, Perceptions of Fit, and Psychological Safety as Factors in Job Satisfaction

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Jamie Franco-Zamudio

Abstract:

The US Census (2015) reports that Millennials (i.e., those born between 1982 and 2000), who account for over one fourth of the US population, are more diverse racially and ethnically than previous generations; subsequent generations are predicted to be even more diverse. As a result, the workforce will become increasingly diverse. Research in Industrial/Organizational Psychology reveals both the positive and negative consequences of working in a diverse workplace (Avery, Lerman, & Volpone, 2010; Ragins, Gonzalez, & Ehrhardt, 2012). The present study seeks to gain a greater understanding regarding diversity in the workplace. More specifically, this study examines whether perception of fit based on racial and ethnic similarity affect workplace satisfaction and determinations of psychological safety. Previous research revealed that diversity in the workplace is positive, as long as there is a perception of psychological safety (Singh, Winkel, & Selvarajan, 2013).

 

Off-Campus Research

 

21. Taylor Gravolet

Title: Novel Aromatic Bridging Ligands as Nanoparticle Colloid Stabilizing Agents

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Carolyn Simmons

 

22. Seth Polansky

Title: Reactivity of Aqueous Thorium(IV) and Plutonium(IV) Clusters

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Carolyn Simmons

 

23. Schaeffer Lersch

Title: Analysis of Aspartame in Diet Coke using Solid Phase Extraction and HPLC

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Carolyn Simmons

 

Class Project or Paper

 

31. Brigit Reynolds

Title: From Pretty Faces to Going Places: The Changing View of Women at Spring Hill College during the Long Sixties

Research Sponsor: Dr. Shane Dillingham

 

32. Alexandra Moorehead

Title: Autonomy and Libertarian Paternalism: The Need to Decriminalize Drug Use

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Nate Zuckerman

Abstract:

I use the libertarian paternalistic view to argue that recreational drugs must be decriminalized to protect our autonomy; however, most drugs should remain illegal in order to protect each individual’s ability to make future autonomous decisions.

 

33. Margaret Baine

Title: Liberation Through Education: Appling the Life and Teachings of Paolo Freire to Religious Education

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Stephen Wilson

 

34. Margaret Baine

Title: Stake her Hard: The Dynamics of Gender, Fantasy, and Sexuality in Bram Stocker’s Dracula

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Catherine Swender

 

35. Jennifer Frederick

Title: Progress of Women of Islam in Turkey and Iran

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Matthew Bagot

 Abstract:

In this essay, I will explain the struggles Muslim women have experienced regarding gender inequality in Iran and Turkey, and then suggest some ways in which they can overcome these inequalities. I will start by explaining the history of each country and how it has developed. Next, I will show the struggles Muslim women in Turkey and Iran have faced throughout history, which will lead to an explanation of how women have expanded their roles in both countries to fight gender inequality. Finally, I will show how women in Turkey and Iran can learn from each other to improve their lives and society around them through (1) religious education, (2) political activism, and (3) mutual use of the Internet.

36. Brendan O’Malley

Title: Incorporating Augmented Reality to Improve Education, Therapy, and Collaboration

 

37. Kirsten Thorn, Kourtney Jones, Zsaree Morrissette, & Areona O’Cain

Title: Stress Management Workshop

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Jamie Franco-Zamudio

 

38. Skylar Blair, Emily Buck, Anne Honsberger, & Claudia Barry

Title: Meth

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Jamie Franco-Zamudio

 

39. Karrie Quirin, Dorothy Brown, Anna Miller, Julisa Kidd, Kenny Ross, Reginald Causey, Armanee Broussard, Madeline Johnson, and the PSY200 Social Psychology class.

Title: Political Attitudes and Support for Free College Education

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Jamie Franco-Zamudio

 One assignment completed during the Attitudes section of the PSY200 Social Psychology class focused on the creation of a Likert-type scale assessing a specific attitude. Students worked with a partner or alone to develop questions for a scale on the topic of their choice. After this assignment, the students indicated an interest in constructing a scale as a class on the topic of Attitudes toward Tuition-Free College Education. This scale served as the basis for a class research project led by Teaching Assistant Karrie Quirin. 

Access to quality education and educational reform are often topics of political debate. Currently, the debates have centered on access to college education. As with other issues, each party has their own unique stance on this matter. Each party has outlined their recommendations for bettering higher education. The Republican party calls for a shift from the traditional four-year college to community colleges and technical schools, no federal loans only private loans, and increased access to higher education for those who "achieve." In contrast, the Democratic party recommends investing in Pell grants, making college tuition tax deductible, and encouraging lifelong and distance learning. Third party views on higher education vary. How does this relate to tuition-free college education? While none of the parties as a whole explicitly state that they support free college education, there is a Democratic candidate for President advocating for tuition-free college in the United States. As a class, we were interested if there was a correlation between political affiliation and views on free college education.

40. Darrien Hawkins, Mary Hutti, Lillian DeSousa, Abby Coakley, Rebecca Byrne, Katherine Mitchell, Erin Sullivan, Darian Price, Lauren Kasuda, Jenna Charnock, Maggie Mastrogiavanni, Connor Peth, Olivia Miller, Clarke Jamieson, Kalle Allison, Natalie Harper, Chianne Laiwa, Courtney Wagoner, and the PSY310 Psychology of Gender class.

Title: Gender Identity

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Jamie Franco-Zamudio

Gender Identity: Biological sex is often determined at birth as either male or female, using genitalia as the discriminant (except in the case of intersexed births were the genitalia is undefined). Gender identity is a fluid process that begins in childhood and may include definitions beyond biological sex. Before an individual has developed his or her ideal version of their own gender identity they usually have already developed a cognitive awareness in the differentiation between the male and female sexes (Bussey & Bandura, 1999). Gender Stereotypes and Cultural Norms: Cultural and societal norms on male and female roles as well as gender stereotypes contribute to the perception of appropriate gender behavior, often influencing people to conform to the prescribed gender specific behavior (Bussey & Bandura, 1999). Not surprisingly, it has been found that behavioral traits that are considered “feminine” are more desirable for women, and traits that are deemed more “masculine” are more desirable for men. For women, these prescribed behaviors include, but are not limited to, being affectionate, cheerful, childlike, compassionate, eager to soothe hurt feelings, caretakers and gullible. For men, characteristics such as athleticism, assertiveness, dominance, forcefulness, aggressiveness, and ambitiousness would be considered gender-prescribed behaviors. Gender and Career Options and Opportunities: Separation of gender roles in labor participation fortifies the stereotypical male and female gender roles (Eagly, 1987). Preconceived notions regarding appropriate careers for men and women persist today. As the understanding of gender has evolved to include lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender identities that do not fit into the male or female categories that the traditional stereotypical view of gender provides, the full spectrum of how an individual may conceptualize their gender identity must also progress to include the variety of ways an individual can identify who they are (Deaux & LaFrance, 1987).  An interview study was conducted to determine whether participants' behaviors were guided by prevailing gender-role ideology. 

Art

 

51. Emily Thrush

Title: La Batalla de la Identidad

Faculty Sponsor: Mr. Peter Favier

 

52. Caitie Beecher

Title: Tribute Series (The Bird and The Chair, Can We Be Heroes?, Door and Monarch, The Giving Tree)

Abstract:

The Tribute Series of paintings contains images that allude to a subject or subject matter that is either gone or forgotten. They include realistic imagery with flat, translucent elements in order to appear as though they are on the main object of the painting. Having a fascination with street art, these projections are meant to appear as part of their surroundings. The Bird and the Chair as well as Door and Monarch pay tribute to nature. The bird and butterfly are part of the natural ecosystem that is being replaced by man-made elements. The Giving Tree, with its reference to the Shel Silverstein poem, represents a loss of childhood that is being replaced with technology. Can We Be Heroes? is a memorial to the late David Bowie and his legacy.

 

53. Audrey Sanchez

Title: Lilian

Faculty Sponsor: Ms. Wanda Sullivan

Abstract:

WHAT am I painting? I am painting portraits of Men and women who are not only friends of mine but that are also part of the LGBT community. Depending on the person, the composition is either a three- quarter view or profile portrait. The portraits are painted in black and white, because I want the focus to be on what they have in common rather than how they are different. The canvases are very textured because it signifies that even though there are imperfections or bumps in the road they are still here.

 

WHAT am I using? The preparations for the painting are just as important as the painting itself.  I take all my own photographs to make sure that my portraits are exactly what I want. My subjects are told to sit down, relax, and think. The result are pictures of people who look like they are thinking of something higher than themselves. Then once I have the photographs, I begin gessoing my canvases. Each canvas must have a significant amount of texture. I feel that the texture not only adds to the meaning of the series, but also creates another interesting feel to the portraits. My choice of mediums are oil paints on canvas. I am using Ivory black, titanium white, and zinc white. I begin with a detailed freehand underpainting and then block in my darks and lights. It is very important to me for the painting to have a lot of contrast, because I feel that strong contrast evokes a stronger emotion for the viewer. It is also very important to me for the paintings to have a likeness to my subjects because that is a big part of why I am painting them, because they are themselves. 

 

WHY am I painting them? These are people who are not afraid to be themselves, and people who I look up to, not because they are gay or lesbian but because they are truly and unapologetically themselves. In a time where people are focusing on the differences in one another and fear of those differences I want to focus on what we have in common and celebrate the people who do not let fear run their lives. So this is why I paint these individuals. The next part of my series will also contain not only LGBT individuals, but also people who are not considered a part of society’s “normal”

 

54. Audrey Sanchez

Title: Equality

Faculty Sponsor: Ms. Wanda Sullivan

Abstract:

WHAT am I painting? I am painting portraits of Men and women who are not only friends of mine but that are also part of the LGBT community. Depending on the person, the composition is either a three- quarter view or profile portrait. The portraits are painted in black and white, because I want the focus to be on what they have in common rather than how they are different. The canvases are very textured because it signifies that even though there are imperfections or bumps in the road they are still here.

 

WHAT am I using? The preparations for the painting are just as important as the painting itself.  I take all my own photographs to make sure that my portraits are exactly what I want. My subjects are told to sit down, relax, and think. The result are pictures of people who look like they are thinking of something higher than themselves. Then once I have the photographs, I begin gessoing my canvases. Each canvas must have a significant amount of texture. I feel that the texture not only adds to the meaning of the series, but also creates another interesting feel to the portraits. My choice of mediums are oil paints on canvas. I am using Ivory black, titanium white, and zinc white. I begin with a detailed freehand underpainting and then block in my darks and lights. It is very important to me for the painting to have a lot of contrast, because I feel that strong contrast evokes a stronger emotion for the viewer. It is also very important to me for the paintings to have a likeness to my subjects because that is a big part of why I am painting them, because they are themselves. 

 

WHY am I painting them? These are people who are not afraid to be themselves, and people who I look up to, not because they are gay or lesbian but because they are truly and unapologetically themselves. In a time where people are focusing on the differences in one another and fear of those differences I want to focus on what we have in common and celebrate the people who do not let fear run their lives. So this is why I paint these individuals. The next part of my series will also contain not only LGBT individuals, but also people who are not considered a part of society’s “normal”

 

55. Dallas Elliot

Title: Fantasy Realism

Faculty Sponsor: Ms. Wanda Sullivan

Abstract:

My works blend human emotion and expression with mythical and imaginative characteristics, and use the human figure to express ideas about the mysterious components of human nature. My interest in these areas begins in my childhood with my mother’s small library of romance novels that I started reading at 9 years old despite being forbidden. However, I was allowed to watch movies and television series that displayed sensuality in paranormal settings years before I developed an interest in her books. All the stories and images I soaked up as a child profoundly influenced how I perceived the world and coped with uncontrollable circumstances. What I was exposed to within film and literature combined realism with fantasy, so I developed a penchant for figurative, fanciful art. I create works using dramatic lighting, props and the human figure. I display sensuality through tactile surfaces, human expression, and imaginative imagery. I paint with smooth brushstrokes and thin, opaque layers of color to build luxurious surfaces that appear tangible. Because literature often uses archetypes as characters, I prefer to ignore stereotypical gender

roles while portraying diverse personalities.

 

Internship/Service Project

 

71. Katherine Sergiovonni, Suzanne Monlezun, Erin Anderson, Alexis Nobles, & Alex Baalman

Title: Little Sisters of the Poor

Faculty Advisor: Dr. Jamie Franco-Zamudio

 

72. Kourtney Jones, Kirsten Thorn, Areona O’Cain, & Zsaree Morrissette

Title: Service Project: W. P. Davidson High School Student Athletic Training Manual

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Jamie Franco-Zamudio

 

Media Project

 

91. Lourdes Gomez de Cordova & Caroline McGraw

Title: No Bite, No Malaria: Incorporating Multifunctional Promotional Methods to Yield Results

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Stuart Babington

 Abstract:

Nonprofit organizations often seek new methods of reaching target audiences and advocating a cause. When crafted correctly, messages communicated across several media can educate, persuade and urge individuals to take action. An educational cross-functional campaign, such as the implementation of an integrated marketing communication plan, can obtain positive promotional results. Project planners initiated a multifunctional campaign for the project No Bite, No Malaria–Mosquitero Project Peru that enabled one message to be communicated across several media. Persuasive messages were constructed to abide by the Elaboration Likelihood Model, resulting in target audience persuasion.  Social media analytics, fundraising goals and surveys were measured to review the effectiveness of the multifunctional campaign. The authors presented results to demonstrate that strategically creating promotional methods that were not previously implemented can achieve substantial results. Results concluded in 44% of target audience reached, 291 new page followers on Facebook and $4,335 raised via crowdfunding, social media and email.

92. Sarah Bolotte

Title: The Lives They Lead: The Student Athlete Blog

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Christina Kotchemidova

 

93. Juan Fernando Soto Martinez

Title: Immigration inFOCUS

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Christina Kotchemidova

Abstract:

“Immigration inFOCUS” provides a voice for students of Spring Hill College who are immigrants and descendants of immigrants. Giving them the opportunity to share their personal stories.

National and local media cover the topic of immigration regularly, but rarely do they provide the perspective of the people who are actually effected by immigration policy. Immigration inFOCUS is a web-based program, divided into three segments. Each segment addressed a different aspect of the topic of immigration; explaining current policy, how policy changes effect immigrants and their descendants, and hearing the voices supporting pro-immigration policies well as supporters of stricter immigration laws across the United States.

The segments feature different formats to better explore the various aspects of these issues. The first is an informative six minute multi-media clip explaining the current immigration policy. The second is a student panel discussion with an exclusive interview of a formally undocumented immigrant, and finally a news talk show debate in the last segment.

Using Facebook as the hosting platform, users are able to like, comment, and share all three segments. This allowed me to utilize Facebook analytics to effectively measure the reach and impact of Immigration inFOCUS.

Immigration inFOCUS was promoted through social media pages such as Spring Hill Student Media and SHC Film Club. Over a two week period Immigration inFOCUS reached an online audience of 1,503 people.

 

94. Chris Portie and Stephen Nash

Title: The Making of Student Television: Badger Block

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Christina Kotchemidova

Abstract:

A student made television program offers a professionally structured outlet for students of all majors and across all academic programs to participate in integrated collaboration in pursuit of professional showcase material and/or personal interest and passion. “Badger Block” was created not only as an extra curricular teaching tool, but also as a way to entertain students at Spring Hill College. By modeling it as a variety television format, the program’s potential appeal to students offered enough distinct programming to capture a substantial percentage of viewers from Spring Hill College’s student population. Through critical analysis of the previous season as well as an understanding of postmodernism that is pervasive in entertainment culture, we created new and updated content that could appeal more to our targeted audience. In addition, through this analysis we were able to pinpoint areas within the the series where we lacked the necessary skills to deliver a professional product. We were able to reach out to individuals who have passion for their craft across different areas of study (graphic design, writing, filming) to supplement the areas lacking in professionalism within the series. The results were not only a substantial amount of views of the series on social media, but the positive feedback on the weekly questionnaires distributed, after each episode had aired. In addition, the continuation of the series has been written into the SHC Film Production Club constitution, so that it may continue to grow and develop throughout generations of students.