2014 Participants

SHCURS Participants 2014

Original Research

1. Marguerite Devereux

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Department: Psychology; BioPsychology

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Estevan Ruiz-Limon

Title: Genetic and Environmental Factors Influencing the Development of Autism Spectrum Disorders

ABSTRACT

With nearly 1 in 88 children being diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), the number of children on the autism spectrum has dramatically increased in the last few years. Many current researchers have examined the genes such as SHANK3 and NRXN1 that affect the development of neurotransmitter systems. Mouse and rat models have shown potential links between neurotransmitters such as serotonin, GABA, and glutamate, which affect development and cause systematic behavioral changes. Animal models have also provided environmental explanations for autism, such as exposure to valproic acid. Each model, however, only looks at one aspect of the disorder, and often overlooks that autism occurs on a spectrum. In order to further the field of autism research, these models must be brought together to examine the interaction of environment on genetics to more fully understand the mechanisms that likely underlie this complex disorder. I propose an experiment which creates a mouse model for autism by altering the SHANK3 gene and exposing the mice to valproic acid in an attempt to recreate the autism spectrum in mice and demonstrate that both genes and environment have an effect on the development of the disorder.

2. Vicky Repp and Caitlyn LaChute

Department: Psychology

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Jamie Franco-Zamudio

Title: The Effects of Emotional Self-Regulation and Self-Efficacy on Academic Success

ABSTRACT

Achieving successful outcomes often requires the application of skills and effort. Belief in one’s capabilities and the ability to emotionally regulate can be contributed to successful outcomes in various aspects of life. Self-efficacy and emotional self-regulation play an important role in success, especially in academia. Individuals who are able to regulate their emotions and have high self-efficacy tend to have greater academic success than individuals who are not able to regulate their emotions and have low self-efficacy have less academic success (Bembenutty, 2011). It was expected that individuals who are able to emotionally regulate and have high levels of self-efficacy would perform better on academic tasks than individuals who cannot emotionally regulate and have low self-efficacy. Skills cultivated during one’s academic career can be applied to not only one’s career but also in everyday life.

3. Ana Caballero

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Department: Psychology

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Jamie Franco-Zamudio

Title: Does Music Induce Mood?

ABSTRACT

The theory of the hedonic treadmill explains this finding by stating that individuals tend to try to maintain a relatively stable level of happiness (Diener, 2006). The increasing popularity of music festivals and online sites like Spotify and Pandora reveals just how much music is part of our culture. Researchers continue to find that music can also be and integral part of our health. The music people gravitate toward has the potential to improve their well-being and to fulfill their needs in daily life (Schafer, 2010). One way this is possible is through mood regulation. Mood control (enhancing or intensifying moods) is one of the primary uses of popular music (Christianson & Roberts, 1999). The theory of mood management is based on the assumption that most people demonstrate preference for more than one type of music depending on their mood (Knobloch&Zillmann, 2002).

Based on the hedonistic premise that individuals seek to experience the highest degree of pleasure possible under given circumstances, the theory of mood management predicts that people who experience a negative mood state such as depression or sadness will seek out positive entertainment choices in order to combat their unpleasant feelings (Knobloch and Zillmann, pp. 352, 2002). The aim for this study is to replicate the findings of Knobloch and Zillmann’s research on mood management by inducing an initial mood and observing the way selective exposure alters the mood (2002). Results showed that participants who were placed in a good mood chose to listen to soothing songs instead of energetic songs. However, those who were placed in a bad mood did not show a preference for either energetic and soothing.

4. Lorenzo Croom

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Department: Psychology

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Jamie Franco-Zamudio

Title: The Role of Social Identity on Musical Preference

ABSTRACT

Throughout time music has played an important role in society and people’s identity. People listen to music in a variety of places and situations such as in the car on the radio or on their android phones and iPods when they are studying. Despite the prevalence of music, research investigating the reasons for people’s musical preference is inconclusive.  The goal of this was to examine the relationship between social identity and musical preference by conducting a Spearman’s correlation. Results did not support previous findings between musical preference and social identity but further analyses did reveal that people preferred to listen to music to change their mood.

5. Carlee Sinkus and Emily Martin

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Department: Psychology

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Jamie Franco-Zamudio

Title: How Stress Experienced by College Students Influences Alcohol Consumption

ABSTRACT

Drinking participation is much higher among young adults and college students compared to other age groups (Wechsler, Lee, Kuo, Seibring, Nelson, & Lee, 2002).  Motivations for drinking include drinking to abide by the social norm and to cope with negative emotions (Cooper, 1994).  Students who drink to cope (internal) and to fit the social norm (external) are engaging in negative reinforcement (Cooper, 1994).  The present study aims to show that undergraduate college students (N = 101) are more likely to drink alcohol if they have higher levels of academic and social stress.  We provided an online questionnaire.  We predicted that students with higher levels of stress often turn to alcohol to alleviate this stress (academic and social).  Participants reported drinking approximately 2-4 times per month (= 1.72, SD = 1.07) and having approximately 1-2 drinks when they did drink (M = .94, SD = 1.05). Participants reported drinking in response to social (M = 3.43, SD = 1.56) and academic (M = 2.37, SD = 2.49) circumstances.  Overall, participants reported moderate to high levels of stress (M = 6.07, SD = 4.75) and anxiety (M= 3.63, SD = 4.23).  Those who reported high stress and anxiety reported  more occurrences of drinking, F(1, 75)=6.3, p <.05 than their counterparts.  There were no statistically significant differences between stress and anxiety with regard to number of drinks consumed while drinking, F( 1, 72)=.47, >.05.  Participants with high levels of stress and anxiety reported that they drink when experiencing negative emotions (stress or anxiety) related to academics, F(1, 78)=.7.5, p < .05. This finding was also significant for participants reporting only high levels of anxiety (and not stress), F(1,78)=16.1, p < .05 and for participants reporting only high levels of stress (and not anxiety), F(1,78)=16.1, p < .05.  In the future, there should be a different measure of “student stress”, because the Student Stress Test did not yield significant results.  There should also be a larger sample size.  In the future, we would like to examine whether there would be any differences in reasons for drinking or quantity of drinks consumed based on sociodemographic factors.

 

6. Amy Lyons and Kirsten Bordis

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Department: Psychology

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Jamie Franco-Zamudio

Title: Associations Between Adult Attachment Style and Texting Communication in Romantic Relationships

ABSTRACT

Text messaging has become a very prevalent form of communication in U.S. society, especially among young adults (Smith, 2011).  Previous research has shown that use of technological communication, specifically text messaging, is related to positive relationship satisfaction within romantic relationships (Walther, 2007; Perry & Werner-Wilson, 2011; Coyne, Stockdale, Busby, Iverson, & Grant, 2011).  Morey, Gentzler, Creasy, Oberhauser, and Westerman (2013) found that individuals with an insecure adult attachment style may benefit from using this texting communication in their romantic relationships. The present study aims to further the understanding of the relationship between attachment style, use of texting communication, and relationship satisfaction.  Participants (N = 98) completed an online questionnaire including the Experiences in Close Relationships-Revised Scale to determine attachment style, the Relationship Assessment Scale to determine relationship satisfaction, and reported text messages sent per week to a romantic partner.  The questionnaire also included the Iowa Communications Record to determine general relationship communication quality.  Results revealed that attachment style was significantly related to relationship satisfaction (α = ), but there was no relationship between texting use and relationship satisfaction (α = ) and no interaction between attachment style and texting use (α = ).  However, after controlling for general relationship communication quality, there was no relationship between attachment style and relationship communication suggesting that general relationship communication quality is a mediating variable between attachment style and relationship satisfaction.

7. Ashley Ledet and Paige Guillory

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Department: Chemistry

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Carolyn Simmons

Title: Quantitative Analysis of Aspartame in Diet Coke

ABSTRACT

The ultimate goal of this research project is to develop a laboratory activity for students enrolled in the CHM 304 Instrumental Analysis lab that utilizes a novel method for the chromatographic determination of aspartame and its degradation products in samples of Diet Coke. In phase one of the experimentation, UV absorption by aspartame in solutions at various pH’s were analyzed, chromatographic behavior of aspartame at various pH’s were mapped, and solvents for extraction were explored. It was determined that a pH of 5 examined at 254nm yielded optimal results.

 

8. Joshua Rocha

Department: Psychology, BioPsychology

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Estevan Ruiz-Limon

Title: The Gay Gene

 

Off-Campus Research

11. Jacob Files

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Department: Biochemistry

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Raluca Craciun

Title: Determining the Role of Linker Histones in DNA Damage Repair

Authors:  David T. Brown1, Thomas Flanagan1, Akash Gunjan2, Jacob Files1,3

Presenter:  Jacob Files1,3  Phone and Email: (601)213-7611; jacob.k.files@email.shc.edu

1 Department of Biochemistry, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS 39216

2 Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Florida State University
Tallahassee, FL 32306

3 Current address: Spring Hill College, 4000 Dauphin Street Box #318, Mobile AL, 36608

ABSTRACT

The linker or H1 histones are a family of nuclear proteins that is crucial to packaging DNA into nuclesosomes and for the formation of compact higher-order chromatin structures. In mammals, there are at least eleven different, evolutionarily conserved, linker histone isotypes, although the functional significance for this heterogeneity remains unclear.  It was found relatively recently that linker histones are mobile within the nucleus, interacting tightly but transiently with DNA at a particular chromatin site then unbinding moving to a new location.  Release of H1 from chromatin leads to local chromatin relaxation, an essential process for the repair of DNA in response to damage. Our hypothesis is that the minor  linker histone isotypes H1a and H1b play a role in this process.  We first constructed cell lines expressing fluorescently-tagged versions of H1a or H1b and performed FRAP (Florescent Recovery After Photobleaching) assays to determine the relative mobility of each respective linker histone isotype.  The results showed that H1b was much less mobile and therefore had a higher binding affinity for DNA than isotype H1a.  We then produced another set of cell lines that overexpressed large amounts of untagged H1a or H1b.  Into these lines we introduced fluorescently-tagged versions of PARP1 or PCNA, two proteins that are recruited to DNA in response to damage. We used micro-irradiation to monitor the kinetics of PCNA and PARP1 recruitment to localized sites of DNA damage. We observed that the overexpression of H1b, and to a lesser degree H1a, resulted in significantly slower recruitment of PARP1 and PCNA relative to control cell lines, indicative of impaired DNA damage repair. We conclude that modulation of DNA compaction by linker histone isotypes impacts the efficiency of DNA repair.

 

12. James Kizziah

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Department: Chemistry

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Carolyn Simmons

Title: Introduction of Tryptophan Mutants into WT 3 M26I DJ-1 to Probe Differences in Protein Behavior

James Kizziah†, Nicole M. Milkovic, and Mark A. Wilson

†Department of Biochemistry, Spring Hill College, AL 36608

Department of Biochemistry and the Redox Biology Center, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, NE 68588

ABSTRACT

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease resulting from the death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra of the midbrain. Mutations in DJ-1, a small, conserved protein (189 amino acids) involved in the oxidative stress response and mitochondrial function, cause a rare form of heritable parkinsonism.   Furthermore, the oxidation of a conserved cysteine residue (C106) has been shown to be necessary for DJ-1-mediated cytoprotection, suggesting a mechanism by which DJ-1 senses the redox status of the cell.  Several autosomal recessive missense mutations in DJ-1, including L166P and M26I, result in parkinsonism. The pathogenic M26I mutation causes packing defects in the core of the protein that somehow disrupt the protein’s protective function; however, M26I does not disrupt the homodimerization of DJ-1, and it is unknown exactly how the mutation causes parkinsonism. In order to probe the physical basis of DJ-1 dysfunction caused by the M26I mutation, we have incorporated a fluorescent reporter tryptophan (W) at the L77, L101, Y141, and K148 positions so that we may further explore the differences between the pathogenic M26I DJ-1 and the wild-type protein in their reduced and oxidized forms. In particular, the L101W mutation is of interest because it causes only minor, local changes in the protein crystal structure yet gives different quantum yields between the wild-type and M26I and it is located between the M26/I26 and C106 residues. Its location will therefore aid in our objective of evaluating the coupled impact of the C106 oxidation state and the pathogenic M26I mutation on DJ-1 structure in solution. In this study, we show that several of the W mutants have very modest effects on the thermal stability and secondary structure of DJ-1, indicating that they can serve as non-disruptive reporters of differences between WT and M26I DJ-1. Furthermore, results from fluorescence spectroscopy imply that there is a significant change in the environment of the L101 position between WT and M26I and between its reduced and oxidized forms.

 

13. Nicole Kocher

Department: Biology and Chemistry

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Raluca Craciun

Title: Gender Differences in Ultrasound Measures of Biceps and Tendon Regeneration after Wheelchair Propulsion

GENDER DIFFERENCES IN ULTRASOUND MEASURES OF BICEPS TENDON DEGENERATION AFTER WHEELCHAIR PROPULSION

Nicole K. Kocher, Nathan S. Hogaboom, Yen-Shen Lin, Michael L. Boninger

Human Engineering Research Laboratories, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, Pittsburgh, PA
Department of Rehabilitation Science and Technology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
Pre-Health Science Department of Biology, Spring Hill College, Mobile, AL

ABSTRACT

A convenience sample of 17 manual wheelchair users with paraplegia participated in a cross-sectional, repeated-measures study. The purpose was to investigate ultrasound changes in biceps tendon thickness, variance, echogenicity, and contrast in response to wheelchair propulsion and relate these changes to gender. Subjects propelled their own wheelchairs under 5 conditions, including tile and carpet surfaces and a figure-8 course. Ultrasound data was obtained before and after propulsion. Significant interaction effects were observed between gender and time with respect to changes in biceps variance; interactions associated with echogenicity and contrast approached significance. Medium to large effect sizes were associated with interactions. Results indicate propulsion caused a differing effect between men and women in the sample. Further investigation of interaction between gender, time, and biomechanics is warranted with a larger and more even sample size.

 

14. Jonathan McLachlan

Department: Chemistry

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Raluca Craciun, Dr. Carolyn Simmons

Title: Estimating the Near-Membrane Concentration of Phosphodiesterase in HEK-293 Cells

ABSTRACT

Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is an important, ubiquitous second messenger in cells. Phosphodiesterase (PDE) is the critical family of enzymes that hydrolyze cAMP in order to modulate cAMP signaling. cAMP concentrations are thought to be compartmentalized, that is, unique at different locations throughout a cell. Because PDE reacts with specific local concentrations of cAMP within each compartment, it may be possible to estimate the concentration of a known type of PDE in a specific area of the cell. This project is focused on determining the concentration of PDE in the near plasma membrane via cAMP measurements using cyclic nucleotide-gated CNG ion channels and computer modeling techniques. The activity of CNG channels was used to estimate cAMP levels near the plasma membrane. Modeling techniques were implemented in order to estimate subcellular PDE concentrations based upon the time course and amplitude of measured cAMP signals. Results indicate that that PDE levels near the plasma membrane are substantially lower than in the rest of the cell. These results will help us to better understand how signaling specificity is achieved within the cAMP pathway.

 

15. Rachel Wills

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Department: Chemistry

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Raluca Craciun, Dr. Carolyn Simmons

Title: Development of Monomeric Streptavidin as a Generic Crystallization Chaperone for Membrane Protiens

 

Class Projects

31. Bradley Headrick

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Department: Communication Arts

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Christina Kotchemidova

Title: The Greek Unity Workshop: Strengthening Communication and Encouraging Collaboration

ABSTRACT

Preliminary research assisted in establishing a need for greater unity between the Greek organizations at Spring Hill College through a qualitative survey question answered by the leaders of the Greek community and interviews conducted as a means for collecting additional qualitative data. After the need for increased unity was established, research began to plan a workshop to strengthen Greek unity at Spring Hill College through the use of strengthened
communication and increased collaboration between the Greek organizations.  Jillian Van Auken (2013) described the “Continuum of Possible Partnerships,” in which the level of community is where “organizations share resources and risk, work according to a common set of goals and jointly execute events and activities,” and where organizations “have developed a sense of togetherness and reciprocity and cohesively work according to a common vision,” (p. 11). By implementing the Greek Unity Workshop, the hope was to have the Spring Hill College Greek community reach this highest level of partnership within the continuum.

Basing the idea and planning of the workshop on the theory of symbolic interactionism, it was thought to be possible to create an event that would allow members of the Spring Hill College Greek community to derive meaning from their interaction with each other, the speaker and the facilitator. The ideas gained concerning strengthening communication and encouraging collaboration could then lead to greater unity between these Greek organizations.

This paper includes an in-depth look at the research, planning, implementation and evaluation of the Greek Unity Workshop as a successful first step in increasing unity in the Spring Hill College Greek community by way of strengthening communication and encouraging collaboration between the Greek organizations at Spring Hill College.

32. Nick Friedman, Megan Dahl, and Ana Caballero

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Division: Business

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Charmane May

Title: Splitting the Red Sea of the Global Camera Market

ABSTRACT

Business Policy and Strategy (BUS 499) is senior capstone class taken by all business majors.  The course builds upon and integrates the core strategies used by upper-level managers to set the strategic direction of for-profit companies.  Our company, CAM-BAM, was assigned the role of operating in four different geographical regions a global camera company using the GLO-BUS Business Strategy with the seven other companies in our industry.   Although the competition was fierce, we were able to achieve a top 100 global standing five out of the seven years of operating our company.

Our presentation will discuss our unique blue ocean strategy used in the multi-featured camera market.  Beginning in year seven, all eight industries were offering the same price camera with the same quality.  In order to break away, we developed a blue ocean strategy that created by year ten a new market of consumers.  By year twelve, we were tied for first place globally and we had met or exceeded all investors expectations.

 

33. Jordan Krouse, Loren Campbell, and Adam Graddick

Division: Business

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Charmane May

Title: Implementing a Strategy and Outmaneuvering Competitive Forces in a Business Environment

ABSTRACT

In BUS 499, our senior seminar class, we were introduced to business principles that upper-level managers use to make strategic decision that will affect the future success and profitability of their company within their industry. After becoming familiar with these principles, our team was assigned the role of three co-managers operating a virtual camera company in the GLO-BUS Business Strategy Simulation Game.  We were pitted against seven other teams from class competing in our industry, and we were given the task of navigating our camera company through an extremely competitive environment in order to achieve financial profitability.

Our presentation will discuss the industry factors we considered in crafting our initial strategy and what business principles we used to guide our decisions regarding product design, marketing promotions, labor and resource management, and corporate finance.  And more importantly, it will discuss how we adjusted our initial strategy throughout the simulation to dominate the competition and secure a sustainable competitive advantage that kept us in first place in our industry and ranked us in the top 100 globally by year twelve.

 

34. James Grice

Division: Business; CIS

Faculty Sponsor: Rhonda Lucas

Title: A Look into Windows 7

ABSTRACT

Ever since it’s founding in 1975, the Microsoft Corporation has been developing new technologies for the ever-growing computer market.  In 1981, Microsoft made its first major step for advancing computer technologies by launching the Microsoft Disk Operating System, or MS-DOS. MS-DOS was the precursor to modern Windows operating systems, and was fairly rudimentary when everything was considered. As time passed, Microsoft released newer, more advanced, and more practical versions of its Windows operating systems. While the most recent release of Windows is Windows 8, the subject of this research has been the earlier version, Windows 7

 

36. Mary Catherine Goodwin

Department: Communication Arts

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Christina Kotchemidova

Title: College Interning: Recommended for the Future Success of Communications Students

ABSTRACT

This research study examines the importance of internships from the viewpoint of communications professionals.  Internships are understood to be the number one interest of communications professionals when looking to hire college graduates for communications jobs.   Communications students are recommended to engage in internships as a way to increase their future career success as well as apply their scholastic knowledge in real-world situations. The relevant literature shows that internships are useful to students by helping them build professional skills while gaining real-world experience in settings unattainable in a classroom.  Reversely, internships have been criticized for being useless and unfair. Many professionals feel that students can obtain useful and worldly knowledge from other experiences such as working a summer job or volunteering. Primary research was conducted to determine how communications  professionals viewed the importance or unimportance of internships. This research study was conducted using qualitative research, and the method used was in-depth interviewing. Four
participants from communications professions participated in the interviews by supplying answers to sample questions. This study is important because it supplies communications professionals and students with a comprehensive understanding of internship importance.  Professionals and students are provided with information about the value and usefulness of internships through this research study. While many colleges recommend internships but do not require them as a course of study, this research study suggests the importance of engaging in an internship while in college. Further studies should be done to investigate a larger population of communications professionals. This would further enrich the findings of this research.

37. Mary Catherine McKinley

Division: Business; CIS

Faculty Sponsor: Rhonda Lucas

Title: Development of CAE Website

 

38. Diana Weidle

Division: Communication Arts

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Christina Kotchemidova

Title: Lighthouse Hope Olympics: A Fundraising Event for Lighthouse Family Retreat

ABSTRACT

In 2007, the National Cancer Institute Fact Sheet reported, “approximately 10,400 children under age 15 were diagnosed with cancer and about 1,545 children will die from the disease” (¶ 2). There is no known cause of cancer and there is no cure. Hearing the words, “Your child has cancer” are a parent’s worst nightmare. Family’s lives get turned upside-down with levels of emotional and physical stress. Cancer can break family relationships and leave siblings feeling left out and alone.  Lighthouse Family Retreat is a nonprofit organization that serves families living through childhood cancer by providing seaside retreats. They work to help families to laugh, rebuild family relationships, and find hope in God. The senior seminar project that was performed in the spring semester of 2014 was a material fundraiser to benefit this nonprofit organization. With much preparation and multiple strategies and tactics the fundraising event Lighthouse Hope Olympics was executed and successful despite a few setbacks.

 

39. Twarner Witherspoon, Bethany Collins, and Melvin Lang

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Department: Psychology

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Jamie Franco-Zamudio

Title: Case Study: Personality Analysis

 

40. Hannah Yarbourgh and Kristen DeAngelo

Department: Psychology

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Jamie Franco-Zamudio

Title: Case Study

 

41. Tempey Hamilton

Department: Psychology

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Jamie Franco-Zamudio

Title: Scandal: Sternberg's Love Triangle

 

42. Whitney Lambeth, Tempey Hamilton, Brian Schmitt, Robert "Louie" Trueting, Brandon Thompson, Justin Rooks, Des McWilliams, DeShala Jackson, Madeline Perseghin, Rebecca Byrne, and Tatiana Gonzalez

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Department: Psychology

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Jamie Franco-Zamudio

Title: Creating an Attitudes Toward Homosexuality Scale

 

43. Katherine Abalos, Emily Hanson, Leah McLarty, Victoria LeBlanc

Department: Psychology

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Jamie Franco-Zamudio

Title: Personality Case Study

 

Service

51. Annie Babington, Najgee Gatson, Jonathan Smith, Lauren Kilroy, and Lennsey Hanchey

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Jamie Franco-Zamudio

Title: Reaching Out to the Little Tree

 

52. Lesliey Garza

Department: Communication Arts

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Christina Kotchemidova

Title:  A Dog Wash for ARF: Helping Strays One Pooch at a Time

 

53. Michael Short and Erin Claxton

Department: Psychology

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Jamie Franco-Zamudio

Title: Light of the Village Service Project

 

54. Edwin Burgess, Greg Overbeek, Harrison McNab, Hannah Yarbourgh, Ashley Wattenbe, Meg Devereux, Melvin Lang, Melin Portillo, Annie Babington, and Alex Himel

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Department: Psychology

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Jamie Franco-Zamudio

Title: 2014 SHC Student Experiences Study

ABSTRACT

Several key factors that influence college retention are academic performance, attitudes and satisfaction, academic engagement, and social and family support (Jensen, 2011; Tinto, 1999, 2004). Our goal was to examine whether Spring Hill College (SHC) students’ expectations were met and whether they were satisfied with their academic experiences. In addition, we asked students for their recommendations for enhancing learning. The current study builds upon two previous Student Experiences Studies at SHC. The 2014 Student Experiences Study primarily consisted of previously asked questions related to retention, while including a section relevant to the topic selection of the upcoming SHC Quality Enhancement Plan.  Results and applications will be discussed.

Art

62. Jolene Bruard (will present in LeBlanc)

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Department: Fine Arts

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Pieter Favier

Title: Untitled

 

63. Sasha Shirazi (will present in Eichold)

Department: Fine Arts

Faculty Sponsor: Wanda Sullivan

Title:

 

64. Rachael Cochran  (will present in Eichold)

Department: Fine Arts

Faculty Sponsor: Wanda Sullivan

Title: Perception

Artist Statement:

Six years ago I was battling numerous medical illnesses, as well as one life altering night that left me physically wounded and in the hospital. Mentally I shut down, I did not know how to move forward with my life. At the age of sixteen I felt like I had already lived for decades, not just one. The day all of that changed was the day my art professor gave me a piece of clay and told me to make anything I wanted. I made a small vessel with rope indentations covering it, symbolizing how bonded I felt to my life. I realized then that art had become my way to communicate all of the situations I had already been through.

I started with clay, but moved to mixed media. My focus was on healing, not about what I was making but how it made me feel when I was doing it. My skills continually evolved as my hands became more aware of what they were doing once I was done using art as a healing mechanism. Now I focus on printmaking, and ceramics.

Now, trees are my symbolism for life,  although there may be dormant periods life is still underneath it all. They may die, but they will have already planted their seeds somewhere else in the world and are producing new life. The female torso symbolizes the struggles I have faced with my own body from adolescence up until now. It is forever changing, but there will always be those scares of the life I have lived.

 

65. Kyle Quinlan  (will present in Eichold)

Department: Fine Arts

Faculty Sponsor: Wanda Sullivan

Title:

 

66. Marie Booth  (will present in Eichold)

Department: Fine Arts

Faculty Sponsor: Wanda Sullivan

Title: Perception: The lens Through Which We See the World

Artist Statement:

My body or work is simply inspired by the world around me. A world of people places and things that in some small or very big way have fashioned the lens through which I see the world.

There are three divisions of my work: Observation, Experience, and Worldview. These divisions are part of the components of the formation of ones lens of perception. Each individual forms a unique lens known as their paradigm or worldview.  This paradigm is formed through observations and experiences. In my collection there are representations of observations of nature, experiences through relationships, and ones approach to the world when seen through the lens of perception.

 

Media

81. Emily Hill and Kevin Smith

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Department: Communications

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Stuart Babington

Title: The Effectiveness of Social Media and Web-Based Marketing on a Local Non-Profit

ABSTRACT

This project attempted to determine if social media and web-based fundraising are an effective way for nonprofits to achieve fundraising goals. Media Richness Theory states that media offering more interactivity, visual and auditory elements are richest. Researchers analyzed data reports of social media interaction and website visitors to evaluate success. Surveys and donation reports were evaluated and the results determined that social media and web-based fundraising are an effective way for nonprofits to receive donations.

 

82. Alicia Candela

Department: Communication Arts

Faculty Sponsor: Dr. Stuart Babington

Title: Music Matters: An Examination of a Blogs Influence on Youth Music Programs

ABSTRACT

Research has proven that music education in schools has been struggling due to budget cuts because of the economy. Studies have shown the benefits that music education offers children such as discipline, improvement of math and reading skills, and improves the ability to retain information. Blogging has been proven to be a useful tool to help students who are learning about online media. Blogs have also been useful to help inform the public about certain topics and have been known to generate news. The research question that was asked by the project planner was would creating a blog that highlights two children’s choirs, Mobile Singing Children and the Pensacola Children’s Chorus, help to inform the public about music education and the role it has on the lives of young people?

A blog was created using tumblr.com to feature stories that highlighted the two organizations, Pensacola Children’s Chorus and Mobile’s Singing Children. The blog helped to emphasize their views on music education and the benefits that music has on children. In order to evaluate the success for this project, the data that was collected were views counted on stat counter, feedback from a survey generated by surveymonkey.com, and comments, likes and messages received about the project on Facebook.

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